How To Vacuum A Pool

by Pool Builders on 09-26-2011 in Articles

A swimming pool is a valuable addition to a home, adding recreational, aesthetic, and health benefits to all who enjoy it. If you want to avoid allowing the pool to become a liability instead of an asset, regular cleaning is necessary. One of the essential tasks in basic swimming pool care is vacuuming, and knowing how to vacuum a pool will help protect your investment.

Learning how to vacuum a pool with basic equipment is not difficult. To begin, you will need a pool hose that is sufficiently long enough that it can reach the far side of the pool from the inlet. An expanding pool pole that can reach the pool's center from the sides is next. Attachments for the vacuum head include wheels or a brush and a leaf adapter with a skimmer basket. Having gathered your tools, you should check the suction line valve if your pool is so equipped; before beginning to vacuum, you need to select the port that will be used in vacuuming, either lower suction fitting or skimmer.

The next step is assembly. Connect the vacuum head to the hose; high-end hoses will have swiveling ends, and this is the end that should be joined to the head to prevent problems with drawing air. The hose must be secure, and the vacuum head should be attached firmly to the pole. After checking the connections, lower the head, pole, and hose into the deep end, leaving one end of the pole above the water.

Then take the free end of the hose and fill the hose with water, preventing air from entering the pump. This is known as priming. The final step is the vacuuming itself, and the simplest. Keeping water in the hose, attach the skimmer basket or leaf trap and slowly maneuver the vacuum along the pool's sides and bottom.

Vacuuming a pool is a simple task when performed regularly, and can be a relaxing chore on a sunny day. For most pools, once a week is sufficient, with spot cleaning done at need. Pools that are left unused for the most part, and are located near trees and shrubs that shed debris into the water, will need more frequent cleanings. Otherwise the pool can become a slimy green mess, with a layer of leaves decaying on the floor and water teeming with bacteria and algae. When enough debris has collected to hide the floor, a simple vacuum will no longer be sufficient for the task. Knowing how to vacuum a pool saves both time and money in the long run.

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